Execution Hollow

A place for odd or rarely told stories about pre-WWI West Point & the Hudson Valley. 

Why Execution Hollow?

Why Execution Hollow?

This 1883 map shows Execution Hollow in the middle of the Plain at West Point. Source: U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey, 1883. 

This 1883 map shows Execution Hollow in the middle of the Plain at West Point. Source: U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey, 1883. 

Welcome to ExecutionHollow.com. I've created this blog to share information about the geography and history of the Hudson Valley and West Point collected over years of personal research. But why "Execution Hollow?" Execution Hollow was a a prominent depression on the Plain at West Point and a key feature of the landscape until about 1912. This now-lost part of the terrain represents my interest in West Point history because it was a feature that was known to all but then completely disappeared. Few visitors sitting in the western stands at a West Point parade would guess that a century and a half ago, there was a deep hole at the same place. I hope that this blog will bring  these forgotten aspects of the Hudson Highlands and West Point to a wider audience. 

My Focus:

  • West Point and the Hudson Valley BEFORE World War I. 
  • Fun facts, random trivia, and in-depth articles (from time-to-time).

What I will avoid and not tolerate:

  • Current West Point news, issues, policy, and events, unless they directly deal with pre-WWI.
  • Abusive comments, hatred, know-it-all's, and rudeness. If you don't like what I write or post, send me the link to your own blog. 

The Disclaimer: 

  • This website and associated social media are not affiliated with the United States Military Academy, the Department of Defense, or the United States Government. Any opinions expressed are the author's own and based on the author's personal research. 

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"The Single Discharge of a Cannon": The Cadet Monument

"The Single Discharge of a Cannon": The Cadet Monument